Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 70 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: First time at the RYA Dinghy Show #23425
    steve13003
    Participant

    Hi,

    Another reason for having the hatches is to ensure that on hot days the expanding air in the tanks will pressurise the tanks can result in failures of joints.  When leaving a boat one should remove one hatch in each tank to prevent any build up of pressure.

    Steve

    in reply to: question on my Speed Sails GP14 No.13945 #23314
    steve13003
    Participant

    Hi,  If you need to remove the centre board from your boat this done by having the boat on its side, remove the slot gasket then you will see a plate over a wedge secured by two screws – usually very tight!!.  Once the plate and wedge are removed you can lift the CB up from the captive pivot and out of the boat and then make and changes to the friction device as needed.

    in reply to: Jib / Genoa wire halyard diameter #22915
    steve13003
    Participant

    Hi,  Having used HyField leavers on a number of older GPs and had a few near misses with fingers when releasing the tension I would suggest that using a muscle box rather than the Hyfield is safer and is jus as easy to set up the tail from the muscle box can be cleated off on the mast.  If planning to use a wire halyard it is normal to exit from the back of the mast above the leaver, if you use a low stretch (Dynema or Spectra) rope this can be lead up to the leaver or muscle box from the normal sheave at the bottom of the mast.  The problem with this will be how to have a loop that will pass through the sheave box.

    Preference use a wire halyard, muscle box with hook at top, exit for wire halyard and rope tail from hole in back of mast (if an internal halyard Super Spars or Proctor mast) or if an old IYE gold mast with the halyard in the sail track – open up the track so that the halyard can exit above the hook, take the tensioning rope to a Clamcleat fixed to the mast below the muscle box.

    I use a hand swaging tool, two pieces of steel with bolts to clamp the ferule around the wire,  it has 3 or 4 different size holes for the normal wire / ferule sizes.  End results are not as neat as the professionally swaged wire but never had one fail and as it is portable has been useful for running repairs when travelling to Open Mtgs etc.  Copper ferules and hard eyes available on eBay.

    in reply to: Speed converstion to under deck genoa sheeting #21982
    steve13003
    Participant

    I would agree with Chris – it is virtually impossible to retro fit through deck sheeting to an early Speed GP, fitting through deck sheeting to a wooden hull either Series 1 or 2 is possible and much easier.  If buying a Speed boat with through deck sheeting make sure the plywood under the deck is in good condition as it can rot and is very difficult to replace. See my article in Mainsail 2 years ago about plywood rot in Speed boats.

    steve13003
    Participant

    Hi,

    Taking this in easy steps,

    R W Davies was a boat builder and repairer based in Westcliff on Sea, Essex.  His son Ray sailed a wooden GP at Leigh on Sea Sailing Club late 1960’s to early 1970’s now lives near Brightlingsea, but he never did any serious work in the family boat yard.

    I didnt ever remember RWD moulding GPs I think they bought part finished hulls from Thames Marine on Canvey Island and finished them.

    Do the side bouyancy tanks run full way to the transom? that would be Mk2, or do they stop just before the stern deck? with a full width tank under the stern deck? which would be Mk1.

    If there is registered number it will be on a plate mould or fixed to the inside of the keel just aft of the plate case, will be beneath any floor boards.  The number 8866 would be correct for an early MK2 GRP hull.

    When you open up the transom flap holes you will need new hinged flaps – perspex or other stiff plastic and shockcord to hold shut.

    Hope that helps

    Steve GP14197

    in reply to: Spinnaker rigging #21584
    steve13003
    Participant

    In first instance I will try to describe the current spinnaker halyard set up in my SP Mk1 No 14179 – you should be able to use this set up in most GPs.

    1 The spinnaker halyard is in two parts – the first part runs up the mast, one end is tied to the head of the sail, exits the mast from the starboard side through a floating block and is tied off to a deck eye near to the bow buoyancy tank just to the starboard side of the centre line.  The length of this part will need to be adjusted so that sail is in the correct position when hoisted.

    2. The second part of the halyard runs along the starboard side of the plate case, one end is tied to the floating block on the first part of the halyard where it exits from the mast.  This second part is taken to a check or swivel block fixed on the transom knee, it then runs forward to a jamb cleat about 3000mm aft of the back of the platecase, finally through a swivel block just in front of the jamb cleat.

    If you want to use a pump action cleat this goes in place of the final jamb cleat.

    It is also possible to have a split halyard running up the forestay, was popular up to about 15 years ago but most recent boats have been rigged with the internal 2 to 1 system described – but that is another story.

    Hope that you can follow the description

    in reply to: New Halyards for old boat #21530
    steve13003
    Participant

    Hi,

    For the main halyard dont bother with wire use Spectra or similar make off on to a standard wrap around cleat.  Genoa Halyard must be wire with a rope tail spliced if a 3 plat rope or overlap and sew to make a loop.  For the kicker again ditch the wire and use Spectra or Dynema core rope, if you are using a cascade system the rope can be simply tied to the blocks and the mast loop with bowline knots – it is just a matter of setting lengths with the mast and boom in the boat.  For other kicker systems such as a lever – use wire between lever , boom and mast; or multi sheeve blocks Spectra or Dynema.

    You say you have an old gold IYE mast – make sure the mast is free from corrosion main areas where these masts suffered are around the genoa sheave box, the spinnaker sheave box / some had tube to lead halyard to the mainsail track rather than having the halyard inside the main tube part of the mast, also if spreaders are fitted check the areas around the spreader bracket, as these were often fitted after the mast left IYE anti corrosion paste was normally used.  To clean the mast I would use a pressure washer, followed by a car body cleaner T-Cut or similar and finally a good coat of wax polish.

    Steve Corbet

    in reply to: Speed 13954 more problems #21402
    steve13003
    Participant

    Paul,

    Having just written last thoughts I remembered the final problem I had  solved was the leak into the main buoyancy tank under the cockpit floor, one of the self bailers had not been sealed and after every sail we had several litres of water to drain out, this was keeping the wood in the under cockpit area wet!

    in reply to: Speed 13954 more problems #21400
    steve13003
    Participant

    Oliver,

     

    Good advice if access to the wood to be treated is easy, but on a Speed GP14 the bare plywood is hidden away and is difficult to see let alone access to apply any coating.  The areas that Paul is considering are the vertical piece of plywood inside the transom to which the rudder fittings are bolted – access is through the inspection hatch on the port side of the stern knee, it is just possible to get your hand through the hatch to the rudder fitting bolts but you cannot see what you are doing, it is feel only – and coating would need to be sprayed on, so an epoxy would not be possible unless applied with a squirty bottle.  The other areas are the pieces of plywood bonded to the underside of the deck to support the under deck genoa tracks and first turning block – these are best accessed with the boat upside down with the boat supported on high supports so that the work can be carried out from under the boat, to avoid getting the coating into the genoa blocks and tracks these would need to be removed and the bolts taped over then an epoxy or other coating could be applied.

    Other areas of plywood tat gave me problems had been coated or bonded in during building the boat but due to poor workmanship the bonding layers had failed and water penetrated the plywood – plywood under the side thwarts, turning block pads all needed repairs.  The other main problem area was the pad under the mast foot track which was between the cockpit floor and the hull, once this is wet and rotten only way to repair is to cut a hole in the outer hull, replace the wood and then make good the hull, trying to coat this insitu would be spraying something through the two inspection hatches in the cockpit floor and then it would be very hit and miss as it is not possible to see what you are actually doing!!

    Sorry this is negative but access to the bare plywood fitted to the Speed GP14s is very difficult and needs professional repairs if rot is found.

    Steve

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 9 months ago by steve13003.
    in reply to: Speed 13954 more problems #21377
    steve13003
    Participant

    Paul,

    Hope you dont find any rot in the ply wood bits in your boat, other places to check are the plywood pads bonded to the sides of the hull for the genoa sheet turning blocks and finally the pads bonded to the hull for the shroud plates.  The genoa sheet pads debonded on 13954, the shroud plates seemed to be sound but I had had enough and part exchanged her with SP Boats for an SP1 boat No 14197 which Steve Parker assured me would not rot – so far it has been a great boat to sail.  Just want to get back on the water once lockdown is over.

    in reply to: GP14 Slot Gasket Fitting #21278
    steve13003
    Participant

    Hi

    Yes the gasket should overlap by 4mm or so if using a sail cloth version, some now use a Mylar slot gasket which is fitted as a single piece stuck down with Thixofix glue and held under the rubbing bands and then slit after fitting.  Your wooden Y fairings are unique, but I would still take the gasket material under the Y fairings to the point where the Y is a single, to make sure no step between the Y fairing and the alloy rubbing strips, paint or varnish the hull before fitting the slot gasket, paint varnish the Y fairings before fitting.

    in reply to: GP14 Slot Gasket Fitting #21263
    steve13003
    Participant

    Hi,

    Not much to add to Oliver’s comments but it is normal to bring the new slot gasket forward to be under the forward Y fairing, trim off any excess material after screwing down.  To get the best fit and performance I normally tension the new slot gasket by having eyelets aft of the end of the slot through which you can pass a rope to the transom keeping the gasket tight while you screw down the rubbing bands to hold it in place, make the screw holes as described by Oliver once tensioned.  Make sure that screws in the rubbing band are completely within the countersink recesses – file down the heads if necessary so no sharp exposed edges to catch when sliding you boat on and off the trolley .

    Regards Steve

     

    in reply to: GP14 Rigging Kicking Strap/Vang/Cunningham #20926
    steve13003
    Participant

    Rob

    Oliver has given you some information regarding efficiency ratios used over the years.  Early boats I sailed had simple multi purchase block and tackle systems with an integral jamb cleat on the lower multi block for the crew to make the adjustments.  Problem with the multi block systems was friction with the ropes running though the blocks – the next step was to use a leaver system with a two part adjustment rope which was either cleated on the mast or lead through block along the side of the plate case or even better to the side benches.

    The modern systems use cascade blocks lead back to the side benches or to the aft end of the plate case.  can be powerful but can be set up to limit loads.

    For a Cunningham system a simple single run of 6mm rope from an eye on the mast though the eye or block on the sail down the other side of the mast to a jamb cleat on the mast.  You can of course double up the purchase and also lead the ropes back to cleats on the side benches or on the plate case.

    There are pictures of rigging systems on this web site but most show newer series boats – I have a set of sketches and some photos of older systems – send me an email if you would like a copy [email protected]

    Steve Corbet

    in reply to: Snapshots of the Beginnings of the Class #20321
    steve13003
    Participant

    When I was sorting out my Speed GP14 No 13954 I was told that at the time she was made Speed about 2008, Speed were very busy and that hulls and decks were being moulded by an outside company in Todmorden, never got the name, and then shipped back to Speed for the fit out before delivery.  At the start of this arrangement Speed provided the plywood reinforcement pieces, but later the sub contractor sourced the plywood reinforcement locally – they didn’t use a good quality plywood which in my boat and a number of others rotted, leading to structural failures in some key parts of the boat.

    Steve Corbet

    in reply to: Advice required on MK 1 floorboard creation #20185
    steve13003
    Participant

    Hi,

    I would agree with Oliver’s comment about ‘ positive buoyancy takes up space’, the bag used in each side of a Series 1 boat provide 150lbs of buoyancy each, so a total of 600lbs, the area under the foredeck originally held a triangular pillow which filled about half the height of the space, later we got Crewsaver to make double height pillows which completely filled the bow space.  With this buoyancy when the boat was righted after a capsize the water level will be below the top of the plate case making it possible to clear the water with out the boat continuing to fill up!!.  Later boats and as a retro fit many of us fitted a bulkhead forward of frame 2, either full height to the underside of the deck or if wanting some forward storage a part height tank with the top on the stringer, difficult unless you have the foredeck off!!.

    BUT beware of not having enough buoyancy, also are you replacing the capping over the centre board case? without it water will splash up when moving, even with a slot gasket.

    Steve

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 70 total)