Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 49 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: First time at the RYA Dinghy Show #23408
    Chris
    Participant

    Hmmmmm

    these things I think fall into the catergory of being far easier to while in build than after! I don’t mean to assist you in kicking your own backside for not putting them in but I would certainly be inclined to leave out any that access to cut is excessively difficult. I have found a large holesaw to be a far better tool for cutting these than the old fashioned lots of holes and a jigsaw method and this will help access, as well as make it easier to get them symmetrical. The hatch in the bow tank and two side tanks should be pretty easy to do, the floor may be more of a challenge. That said does it really *need* 4 in the floor? the two at the front allow access to the bow tank bunghole that should be under the false floor to allow drainage (If you didn’t put one in you aren’t the first and wont be the last!). The two at the back serve no real purpose at all besides ventillation. The rear two are probably the hardest to get the holesaw into and on that basis i’d leave them as built. Those need to be under the stern deck, else they’ll get trodden on and broken.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by Chris.
    in reply to: Building mark 1 – in New Zealand timber type #23350
    Chris
    Participant

    Obeche is used for the stringers and structural framework of many boats because its very light and flexible. These don’t need to be especially strong so it was desirable to go all-out for minimum weight to centralise as much of the weight as possible rather than have heavy extremities, particularly the stem and transom – you see quite a few S1 GPs with obeche transoms with mahogany inserts where the fittings go.

    If the boat isn’t going to be raced in its class this level of detail is probably unnecessary and you would undoubtedly get away with using a heavier timber such as ash which maintains the flexibility but is stronger and far less prone to rot. Cedar would also work from the strength/weight point of view but is it flexible enough to go round the curve from the shrouds forward without steaming? (It may be, I don’t know. I know its widely used in rudders and centreboards and also the hog/keel in some classes)

    I wouldn’t get too hung up over weight from your perspective and I think if you aim for minimum weight with no correctors you’ll be ok. The difference between a metre 1×1 inch of obeche vs ash or mahogany is very little and whilst it all adds up you have six kilos to play with!

    I would recommend something harder such as ash or sycamore for the carlins as these will take a beating and cedar/obece dent easily.

    in reply to: question on my Speed Sails GP14 No.13945 #23317
    Chris
    Participant

    long shank screwdriver can tighten it without removal 🙂

    in reply to: question on my Speed Sails GP14 No.13945 #23309
    Chris
    Participant

    There should be a rubber brake on the top of the board below the handle inside the case. Access is only either with the boat on its side of afloat and its tightened with a screwdriver.

    in reply to: Kicker and Rig Tension #22943
    Chris
    Participant

    Well:

    when you apply the kicker the thrust will push the boom forwards, which will bend the mast and reduce the distance between the hounds and chainplates. The mast being forced into the gate won’t help this (400lbs gate open is different to gate closed)

    So, yes, applying a lot of kicker will reduce the rig tension. If you are actually seeing slack shrouds I would have to question why you’re using so much kicker? If you are seeing a wobbly leeward shroud when sitting out this is normal. any more than that and something is wrong.

    in reply to: Genoa Reefing & Furling on GRP Boats #22888
    Chris
    Participant

    Could it not be taken under the deck via a double through deck block?

    in reply to: Genoa lead/car position #22883
    Chris
    Participant

    I would imagine that new sails will probably be cut for through deck sheeting by default if they don’t ask you.

    Those tracks are much too far inboard. But I think you have good information and should proceed as suggested. The rest looks really good!

    in reply to: Genoa lead/car position #22866
    Chris
    Participant

    I think as a sanity check once marked up the in/out position of the slot should be no further inboard than the shroud.

    Fore/aft measurements will be the same as any other boats and I would trust the GingerBoats measurement given above even over what exists on the boat. Remember that with the sheet position lower the block in the deck will need to be further back than old sliding car was. Genoas for through deck sheeting are also cut differently at the clew. You may need to lower your existing genoa on its luff wire (If you can) to get a sheeting angle that works, but it will always be slightly compromised whatever you do. Whether this matters depends upon your aspirations.

    Ive seen all sorts of ways to make an old genoa suit a through deck system, shackles under the tack to “tip” the Genoa backwards – all sorts! Unfortunately the best solution will be a good second hand genoa.

    • This reply was modified 6 months ago by Chris.
    • This reply was modified 6 months ago by Chris.
    in reply to: Basic Mast stepping queston #22774
    Chris
    Participant

    Then gap is too prevent the mast jumping out of the step on classes that use enormous amounts of rake or to make the adjustment of the mast foot a one pin operation on classes like the solo where adjustment is commonplace.

    I think you’ll find that no part of the mast may be behind the rearmost measurement point and the point doesn’t refer to the position of the bolt itself.

    in reply to: Advise sought regards Varnish defects. #22579
    Chris
    Participant

    Artificial light shows all sorts of  “defects” that are otherwise invisible.

    I would be inclined to not worry about it.

    It could be amine blush from the epoxy – did you scotch it with hot soapy water before rubbing out down? If its this you’ve got to back to virtually nothing to eliminate it, which if you cant see it outside is a pretty major task for not a lot of gain – annoying though it is! I saw someone’s OK do this a couple of weeks ago also varnished this summer on you can clearly see it outside. What resin was it?

    • This reply was modified 7 months, 2 weeks ago by Chris.
    in reply to: Advise sought regards Varnish defects. #22576
    Chris
    Participant

    Anything milky or cloudy is almost always moisture. What varnish did you use? Is it visible outside? Flourescent light shows imperfections that afrenmt really there.  Sometimes it will bleed out over a few weeks/months. Some of the two pack brands are mixed by weight and its very, very critical to get right. If it isnt right, its not fully cured and if you wet flat it……..

    Same applies if its insufficiently stirred.

    • This reply was modified 7 months, 2 weeks ago by Chris.
    in reply to: GP builders #22567
    Chris
    Participant

    The name rings a distant bell as a boatbuilder, but not as a builder of GPs.

    I am presuming the boat is a Series 1 aka Mk1 wooden hull?

    Why do you ask the question? If you are after a soundly built boat a visit to see it should tell you all you need to know. The “mass produced” 60s and 70s hulls tended to suffer from cheap ply, steel screws and iffy glue. They were not resin coated and certainly not intended to last 40-50 years when built! The fact that many do is testament to the craftsmanship of the time – only the better ones survive outside.

    My point is that if you go and look at it all of those problems will be immediately apparent if the boat has them, and if the boat is in good order if you maintain it well chances are it will stay that way.

    Will it be fast? That is another question! I suspect if it was a priority you would be looking for a Series 2 boat.

    in reply to: Speed converstion to under deck genoa sheeting #21969
    Chris
    Participant

    It’s not easy at all, access to put the structure under the deck is very awkward without cutting holes in the side. When built this is all put in place before the deck was fitted. The wooden ones are much easier.

    My recommendation would be to buy a boat with through deck sheeting if you want a plastic boat! Sorry

    in reply to: GP14 Slot Gasket Fitting #21275
    Chris
    Participant

    All the advice above is good 🙂

    Last thing from me is that most people think its the back of the gasket that does all the work and affects performance (if this is important), it’s actually the front that does the most and its the front that causes the water to pour in over the top of the case if its either wrong or worn out.

    in reply to: New member and trolley query #20386
    Chris
    Participant

    If you’re sailing on the Welsh Harp you have the O’Neill brothers on site at Welsh Harp Boat Centre. They are also Sovereign Trailers which are very, very good. Not the cheapest but far better than an Ikea flat pack and if you’re patient and keep an eye on ebay a suitable road base will turn up secondhand.

    The trolley is the most important part of your non-sailing kit. If its wrong it could damage your boat or damage you. A GP14 is a heavy boat and needs a good trolley – Don’t cheap out on it 🙂

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 11 months ago by Chris.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 49 total)