Chris Hearn

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 35 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: bow attachment for towing #18975

    Chris Hearn
    Keymaster

    Yes, check out Oliver’s very comprehensive note on Travelling with your GP, which covers the whole process of packing and trailing.

    Go to the Members Area/All About your GP14 and the “Travelling” article is at the bottom of the section Boat Preparation and Tuning, along with lots of other good stuff!

  • in reply to: drain plugs #18965

    Chris Hearn
    Keymaster

    Yes, Chris (the other Chris!) makes a very fair point – even on MK2 wooden boats around the 13000 number I have seen rot around the bottom of the transom, as you mentioned 🙂

  • in reply to: drain plugs #18933

    Chris Hearn
    Keymaster

    Hi Roy,

    As suggested, chandlers stock a range of drain plugs, e.g. Allen here https://www.allenbrothers.co.uk/range/?pid=cjlf6lozp0064d1v40ojuqeke&cid=cjlf6kjph0007c3v42i35ov4t

  • in reply to: Buying a boat. Will it fit in my garage ? #18234

    Chris Hearn
    Keymaster

    @Nigel,

    I am advised by Graham Knox, another long-standing member of the Association and Committee, who is certain of the following “moulded by Bourne Plastics with a number beginning with 68. This is on a metal plate, port side under the bow deck. This records that the boat was moulded in 1968 and the allotted sail number is the following four digits. This comes from my past as Secretary! I am certain that i am correct!”

    So your plate number of 686454. gives a hull number of 6454!

     

  • in reply to: The Basic Boating Book – a great resource! #18205

    Chris Hearn
    Keymaster

    How to re-thread your halyards in the mast?

    Ed: The traditional method is described in the Basic Boating Book and is still relevant, but I have also received a note on another method of re-threading halyards (Thanks Oliver!) which may be easier if you have a long rod and enough workspace, as below:

    Note that Richard Estaugh’s stated method for threading the halliards is the old standard method,  which of course works well (including also for wooden masts),  but when I collected a new mast from his firm around ten years ago the method they used was much easier.    However you do need a horizontal working space at least twice the length of the mast;   so for most of us either the club lawn or the boat park would be the place to do the job.

    • Lay the mast horizontal on either a (long) workbench (or resting on two benches spaced apart),  or on the ground.
    • Remove all the halliard sheaves (one would want to do that anyway even in the “standard” method).
    • Remove the heel fitting.
    • Make up a very long wooden batten,  at least as long as the mast,  with a wire hook or loop on the end.
    • Push this batten up the mast to the appropriate halliard sheave,  hook on the halliard,  and pull it through.
    • Pull the halliard out through the appropriate aperture at the bottom.
    • Re-insert sheaves and heel fitting.

    Job done!

  • in reply to: Buying a boat. Will it fit in my garage ? #18150

    Chris Hearn
    Keymaster

    The masts are always single section, (unlike the Laser)
    I believe the mast length is about 22 feet, so I reckon would NOT fit inside your garage – just stand it up against the side of the house? They are designed to be outside!
    I keep my boat in a garage over the winter, but just on the launch trolley. I think that would just fit inside your garage, but do your own calcs!

    The road trailer stays outside!

    Chris

  • in reply to: Jib Halyard Sheave #18032

    Chris Hearn
    Keymaster

    Hi, and welcome to the GP14 class!
    I am sure one of the experts in older boats will advise more thoroughly! It appears to be an early wooden mast – all the metal masts I have seen are as you have found online, with mounting holes top and bottom, not on the sides (I guess that keeps the “pull” on the sheave in line with the halyard).
    So the two options that occur to me are a) ask here in the forum and/or in the “Classifieds” sections as a “wanted item”, or b) fit a modern one and fill the current holes!

    Good luck!

  • in reply to: Forestay replacement #17959

    Chris Hearn
    Keymaster

    My 2p worth – most GP have a wire forestay with rope at the bottom end to attach to the bow plate. More than one turn as Oliver says. In addition they have a bungee. When the boat is in the park, the gate is usually opened to relax tension on both the gate and  the spreaders. When racing, the bungee stops the forestay being too loose as it can (depending on lengths/tightness of the rope) sag backwards and foul the genoa tallies (woolies).
    When racing, should the genoa wire break (or shackle “come undone”) The load would be shared (unevenly) between the bungee/rope and gate. It _might_ prevent the gate getting ripped out of the boat or the mast crashing backwards. I have never seen that happen, so it is speculation! I HAVE seen that the gate can open if it is knocked when racing – again the rig tension on the genoa means this is not a big deal, but the gate should be closed when sailing.

     


  • Chris Hearn
    Keymaster

    Hi Harry,

    We have just implemented a new section in the “Classifieds” advert section called “Recycling” – offering your boat free to a good home is great! and this would be an ideal place to put the details, and a great first item in this new section 🙂

    Kind Regards

    Chris (webmaster)

  • in reply to: Age of dinghy #17353

    Chris Hearn
    Keymaster

    That’s an early one! Oliver is good on this, or you could ask the association if they have any records of the boat. I believe that boats 1-1000 were produced between about 1950-1956 so I would guess around 65 years old!

  • in reply to: THICKNESS OF RIGGING #17336

    Chris Hearn
    Keymaster

    As always Oliver you are a fantastic mine of useful information on early boats!

  • in reply to: THICKNESS OF RIGGING #17325

    Chris Hearn
    Keymaster

    Hi,

    I think the most useful thing would be to start from the “Rope and Wire Lengths & Thicknesses” quoted in the Members’ area, page “All about your GP14“. I can’t comment on the forestay for a vintage boat, but the purpose (as I understand it) of the forestay is a) to support the mast when the sails are not rigged, and b) to keep the mast up if the sail are rigged but the jib/genoa tension were to suddenly release/break.  On my boat (MkII, approx 20 years old) I have a wire forestay but secured to the bowplate via 6” rope (and also a separate bungee to take out the slack, but allow mast to move back in the slot – helps when rigging the shrouds). I am sure Oliver can advise more accurately and with relevance to much older boats.

     

  • in reply to: Can't get sails to black bands #16973

    Chris Hearn
    Keymaster

    Hi Dave,

    Hoist the sail, (boom on gooseneck), then attach the rope round the mast (I expect it has a proper name), it should be adjusted so that the sail is pulled against the mast with just enough slack so it can “slide”. Do this with outhaul fully off. I think that will solve your problem. You may prefer to lower the sail a little, then with everything attached, hoist to black band at top of mast.
    My own view, and I am only a club racer, is that this modern arrangement allows the cunningham and outhaul to have more effect on the sail shape. I have posted a picture of my own boat in previous post – (boat partly rigged, so everything is NOT set up yet!)

  • in reply to: Can't get sails to black bands #16969

    Chris Hearn
    Keymaster

    @davegp

    OK, one other point to consider which MAY resolve your concerns!

    There are two types of mainsail now around with regard to the bottom of the luff – I know because I have one sail of each type!
    On the first type, (lets call it the “older” style) the bottom of the luff is meant to engage with the pin on the boom –  my older sails were all like that. The second (“newer”) type has a different lower edge at the front end, which  kicks up near the luff.  If you force this into the boom pin it looks like there is extra material “bunched up”. This type is meant to have a short (dyneema is best) rope that goes through the sail hole and round the boom – it rides up the boom a little.
    (See attached picture of my boat – taken part-way through rigging! The sail is hoisted to the black band, the dyneema rope is NOT yet wrapped around the mast (has a red bobble on the end). I think it does show the kick-up of the sail I refer to!. As a side note, my sail does NOT reach to the black band on the back end of the boom, but the sail “measures” correctly so I don’t worry about that! (and it’s GP13509, so not a new boat)

    The sail in the picture is one of these “modern” sails, and I would guess that your kevlar sail (at least) is like that. If you try to mount this type of sail with the pin on the boom, the top will NOT reach the black band!

    I suggest you try “new” method 2 and see what the bottom of the sail looks like – I also think you will find that it also makes the outhaul adjustment look “better” in terms of effect on the bottom of the sail.

    Hope that helps

    Chris H

    • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by  Chris Hearn. Reason: added picture
    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
  • in reply to: Composite GP #16752

    Chris Hearn
    Keymaster

    There are still plenty of Composite boats around if you like the look of a wooden deck – check out pictures from this years World Championship on this site, for example “Day 3

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 35 total)